Мартынова Наталья Юрьевна

Кандидат биологических наук


Старший научный сотрудник (Лаборатория молекулярных основ эмбриогенеза)

Тел.: +7 (495) 336-36-22

Эл. почта: m61@hotmail.ru

Избранные публикации

  1. Eroshkin F.M., Nesterenko A.M., Borodulin A.V., Martynova N.Y., Ermakova G.V., Gyoeva F.K., Orlov E.E., Belogurov A.A. Jr, Lukyanov K.A., Bayramov A.V., Zaraisky A.G. (2016). Noggin4 is a long-range inhibitor of Wnt8 signalling that regulates head development in Xenopus laevis. Sci Rep 6, 23049 [+]

    Noggin4 is a Noggin family secreted protein whose molecular and physiological functions remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that in contrast to other Noggins, Xenopus laevis Noggin4 cannot antagonise BMP signalling; instead, it specifically binds to Wnt8 and inhibits the Wnt/β -catenin pathway. Live imaging demonstrated that Noggin4 diffusivity in embryonic tissues significantly exceeded that of other Noggins. Using the Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) assay and mathematical modelling, we directly estimated the affinity of Noggin4 for Wnt8 in living embryos and determined that Noggin4 fine-tune the Wnt8 posterior-to-anterior gradient. Our results suggest a role for Noggin4 as a unique, freely diffusing, long-range inhibitor of canonical Wnt signalling, thus explaining its ability to promote head development.

    ID:1419
  2. Nesterenko A.M., Orlov E.E., Ermakova G.V., Ivanov I.A., Semenyuk P.I., Orlov V.N., Martynova N.Y., Zaraisky A.G. (2015). Affinity of the heparin binding motif of Noggin1 to heparan sulfate and its visualization in the embryonic tissues. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 468 (1-2), 331–6 [+]

    Heparin binding motifs were found in many secreted proteins and it was suggested that they are responsible for retardation of the protein diffusion within the intercellular space due to the binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycanes (HSPG). Here we used synthetic FITC labeled heparin binding motif (HBM peptide) of the Xenopus laevis secreted BMP inhibitor Noggin1 to study its diffusion along the surface of the heparin beads by FRAP method. As a result, we have found out that diffusivity of HBM-labeled FITC was indeed much lesser than those predicted by theoretical calculations even for whole protein of the Noggin size. We also compared by isothermal titration calorimetry the binding affinity of HBM and the control oligolysine peptide to several natural polyanions including heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, the bacterial dextran sulfate and salmon sperm DNA, and demonstrated that HBM significantly exceeds oligolysine peptide in the affinity to HS, heparin and DNA. By contrast, oligolysine peptide bound with higher affinity to dextran sulfate. We speculate that such a difference may ensure specificity of the morphogen binding to HSPG and could be explained by steric constrains imposed by different distribution of the negative charges along a given polymeric molecule. Finally, by using EGFP-HBM recombinant protein we have visualized the natural pattern of the Noggin1 binding sites within the X. laevis gastrula and demonstrated that these sites forms a dorsal-ventral concentration gradient, with a maximum in the dorsal blastopore lip. In sum, our data provide a quantitative basis for modeling the process of Noggin1 diffusion in embryonic tissues, considering its interaction with HSPG.

    ID:1364
  3. Suntsova M., Gogvadze E.V., Salozhin S., Gaifullin N., Eroshkin F., Dmitriev S.E., Martynova N., Kulikov K., Malakhova G., Tukhbatova G., Bolshakov A.P., Ghilarov D., Garazha A., Aliper A., Cantor C.R., Solokhin Y., Roumiantsev S., Balaban P., Zhavoronkov A., Buzdin A. (2013). Human-specific endogenous retroviral insert serves as an enhancer for the schizophrenia-linked gene PRODH. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. , [+]

    Using a systematic, whole-genome analysis of enhancer activity of human-specific endogenous retroviral inserts (hsERVs), we identified an element, hsERVPRODH, that acts as a tissue-specific enhancer for the PRODH gene, which is required for proper CNS functioning. PRODH is one of the candidate genes for susceptibility to schizophrenia and other neurological disorders. It codes for a proline dehydrogenase enzyme, which catalyses the first step of proline catabolism and most likely is involved in neuromediator synthesis in the CNS. We investigated the mechanisms that regulate hsERVPRODH enhancer activity. We showed that the hsERVPRODH enhancer and the internal CpG island of PRODH synergistically activate its promoter. The enhancer activity of hsERVPRODH is regulated by methylation, and in an undermethylated state it can up-regulate PRODH expression in the hippocampus. The mechanism of hsERVPRODH enhancer activity involves the binding of the transcription factor SOX2, whch is preferentially expressed in hippocampus. We propose that the interaction of hsERVPRODH and PRODH may have contributed to human CNS evolution.

    ID:920
  4. Martynova N.Y., Ermolina L.V., Ermakova G.V., Eroshkin F.M., Gyoeva F.K., Baturina N.S., Zaraisky A.G. (2013). The cytoskeletal protein Zyxin inhibits Shh signaling during the CNS patterning in Xenopus laevis through interaction with the transcription factor Gli1. Dev. Biol. 380 (1), 37–48 [+]

    Zyxin is a cytoskeletal protein that controls cell movements by regulating actin filaments assembly, but it can also modulate gene expression owing to its interactions with the proteins involved in signaling cascades. Therefore, identification of proteins that interact with Zyxin in embryonic cells is a promising way to unravel mechanisms responsible for coupling of two major components of embryogenesis: morphogenetic movements and cell differentiation. Now we show that in Xenopus laevis embryos Zyxin can bind to and suppress activity of the primary effector of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling cascade, the transcription factor Gli1. By using loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that Zyxin is essential for reduction of Shh signaling within the dorsal part of the neural tube of X. laevis embryo. Thus, our finding discloses a novel function of Zyxin in fine tuning of the central neural system patterning which is based on the ventral-to-dorsal gradient of Shh signaling.

    ID:857
  5. Martynova N.Y., Eroshkin F.M., Ermolina L.V., Ermakova G.V., Korotaeva A.L., Smurova K.M., Gyoeva F.K., Zaraisky A.G. (2008). The LIM-domain protein Zyxin binds the homeodomain factor Xanf1/Hesx1 and modulates its activity in the anterior neural plate of Xenopus laevis embryo. Dev. Dyn. 237 (3), 736–49 [+]

    The question of how subdivision of embryo into cell territories acquiring different fates is coordinated with morphogenetic movements shaping the embryonic body still remains poorly resolved. In the present report, we demonstrate that a key regulator of anterior neural plate patterning, the homeodomain transcriptional repressor Xanf1/Hesx1, can bind to the LIM-domain protein Zyxin, which is known to regulate cell morphogenetic movements via influence on actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Using a set of deletion mutants, we found that the Engrailed-type repressor domain of Xanf1 and LIM2-domain of Zyxin are primarily responsible for interaction of these proteins. We also demonstrate that Zyxin overexpression in Xenopus embryos elicits effects similar to those observed in embryos with downregulated Xanf1. In contrast, when the repressor-fused variant of Zyxin is expressed, the forebrain enlargements typical for embryos overexpressing Xanf1 develop. These results are consistent with a possible role of Zyxin as a negative modulator of Xanf1 transcriptional repressing activity.

    ID:78
  6. Ermakova G.V., Solovieva E.A., Martynova N.Y., Zaraisky A.G. (2007). The homeodomain factor Xanf represses expression of genes in the presumptive rostral forebrain that specify more caudal brain regions. Dev. Biol. 307 (2), 483–97 [+]

    Early development of the rostral forebrain (RF) in vertebrates is accompanied by the inhibition of two homeobox regulators, Otx2 and Pax6 in the rostral sector of the anterior neural plate, further giving rise to the RF. However, the precise molecular mechanism and meaning of this inhibition is still obscure. We now demonstrate that the activity of the Anf homeodomain protein is necessary and sufficient for the anterior inhibition of Otx2 and Pax6. Specifically, we show that knockdown of the Xenopus laevis Anf, Xanf, by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides results in the anterior expansion of Otx2 and Pax6 expression into the presumptive RF territory. Furthermore, by overexpressing hormone-inducible activator- and repressor-fused variants of Xanf in the absence of protein synthesis, we present evidence that Xanf can directly downregulate Otx2 and Pax6 but not the more rostrally expressed Bf1, Bf2, Fgf8 and Nkx2.4. These results explain how the inhibitory activity of Xanf can discriminate RF regulators in favor of posterior forebrain ones. Assuming that the Anf type of homeobox is specific for vertebrates, our data suggest that the emergence of Anf in evolution could be a critical event for RF development in vertebrates through the elimination of homologues of modern posterior forebrain regulators from the rostral sector of the anterior neural plate.

    ID:77
  7. Martynova N., Eroshkin F., Ermakova G., Bayramov A., Gray J., Grainger R., Zaraisky A. (2004). Patterning the forebrain: FoxA4a/Pintallavis and Xvent2 determine the posterior limit of Xanf1 expression in the neural plate. Development 131 (10), 2329–38 [+]

    During early development of the nervous system in vertebrates, expression of the homeobox gene Anf/Hesx1/Rpx is restricted to the anterior neural plate subdomain corresponding to the presumptive forebrain. This expression is essential for normal forebrain development and ectopic expression of Xenopus Anf, Xanf1 (also known as Xanf-1), results in severe forebrain abnormalities. By use of transgenic embryos and a novel bi-colour reporter technique, we have identified a cis-regulatory element responsible for transcriptional repression of Xanf1 that defines its posterior expression limit within the neural plate. Using this element as the target in a yeast one-hybrid system, we identified two transcription factors, FoxA4a/Pintallavis and Xvent2 (also known as Xvent-2), which are normally expressed posterior to Xanf1. Overexpression of normal and dominant-negative versions of these factors, as well as inhibition of their mRNA translation by antisense morpholinos, show that they actually function as transcriptional repressors of Xanf1 just behind its posterior expression limit. The extremely high similarity of the identified Anf cis-regulatory sequences in Xenopus, chick and human, indicates that the mechanism restricting posterior expression of Anf in Xenopus is shared among vertebrates. Our findings support Nieuwkoop's activation-transformation model for neural patterning, according to which the entire neurectoderm is initially specified towards an anterior fate, which is later suppressed posteriorly as part of the trunk formation process.

    ID:74