News

  • Spider venom may help to stop neuronal death science news VIII.20

    Venoms of spiders and wasps contain acylpolyamines that act as high-affinity blockers of ionotropic receptors for glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the human central nervous system (CNS). The first representative of acylpolyamines, argiopin from the venom of the orb-weaver spider Argiope lobata, was discovered in 1986 by Eugene Grishin’s team at IBCh RAS. Here, an international team of scientists, including a researcher from IBCh RAS, has used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine the first atomic structure of an argiopin-glutamate receptor complex. This structure will help to design new drugs for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The study is published in Neuron.

  • Fast and safe: new reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins for live-cell nanoscopy science news VII.10

    Russian scientists together with colleagues from Sweden and the USA developed red fluorescent tags that are safe for nanoscopy in living cells. This work was funded by a grant from the Russian Science Foundation (RSF), and the results are published in Nature Methods journal.

  • Genetically encoded fluorescent pH probe for precise monitoring of cellular biochemistry science news V.3

    One of the directions of the Molecular Technologies Laboratory is the development of new tools for bioimaging and optogenetics. Yulia Ermakova, Vsevolod Belousov and other lab members, in an article in Chemical Communications, describe a new member of SypHer family of genetically encoded pH indicators, SypHer3s.

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