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Seminar Dr. Roger New (UK) "New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery"

September 19, 2012 (This event is over)

Dejgin Vladislav

Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents. Title:  New Frontiers in Per-Oral Protein Therapeutics and Drug Discovery

 

Administration of peptides via the oral route is attractive to the patient because it removes the need for injection.  In some cases, however, other benefits are to be gained, because of the fact that materials crossing the gut wall pass straight into the liver.  This is particularly appropriate for insulin, where the liver is the prime organ in the body designated for control of glucose metabolism.  When insulin is administered orally, the hormone is absorbed by receptors on the surface of liver cells, resulting in reduced glucose output, and secretion of IGF-1.  In addition, insulin is prevented from entering into the peripheral circulation, where it could otherwise cause many serious side effects, both indirectly and directly, as a result of coming into contact with vascular and other tissues.  Similar benefits may arise through oral administration of other proteins, such as GLP-1 and PTH. A novel approach to oral administration of labile peptides developed by our group will be discussed.

 

A new combinatorial drug discovery technology will also be discussed, which considerably reduces the time to development of a lead product, and can give rise to agents working through pathways which were previously unknown.  The key aspect of the technology is that building blocks such as amino acids, sugars, heterocyclics etc are brought together on the surface of nanoparticles or micelles.  In this way, two- or three-dimensional structures are created on the surface of the micelles, and these can be screened in biological assays to find out which combination of building blocks is able to elicit a biological response.  The technique is particularly appropriate for creating reagents which can change the behaviour of cells by receptor-mediated interactions, leading to discovery of new peptide therapeutic agents.  

september 11, 2012